My Chad Gadya - the Lamb from the Passover Haggadah Song



   
    March Passover 2002 Edition            
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Chad Gadya, from the Passover Seder

 
 
 
 

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    remember Passovers from my childhood:
sitting at the family table listening to prayers,
hearing the stories, asking the questions,
dipping and eating the foods, looking for the matzah,
and singing this strange and funny song.

    ike many parts of Passover,
Had Gadya did not quite make sense.
On such a happy day,
why sing about animals eating and killing each other?
There was a happy ending though,
so the violence didn't bother me that much.

    have children of my own now,
and I make up a new Haggadah each year for our Passover Seder.
Of course, I keep all the required parts,
but I add joyful stories and songs,
and I look for deeper meanings.
Not for the one right answer, but for possibilities of what can be.

    n my Had Gadya no one gets hurt.
In the process of doing what they always do:
buying, eating, biting, beating, burning, putting out, drinking, and killing,
each living thing is awakened by the spirit of God
within and around them to live together in peace.

    imagine them all smiling at each other,
joining hands, and singing the peace song:
Let there be peace on Earth, and let it begin with me.
My Had Gadya is an affirmation of this vision,
of what can and will be.


My Had Gadya has been taken from a collection that Michael Corob has written and illustrated entitled "Story Paintings From the Heart."
Michael welcomes your vision and comments. You may reach him at Youani@aol.com

~~~~~~~

from the March Passover 2002 Edition of the Jewish Magazine

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